743 grand view, a block down from the park

new times korean church, we wander the halls

at the back of the building old ladies are telling us to go away, mostly they don’t speak english (but when they do—though one old lady was going to invite us in to share lunch, I would’ve went with that but we were on a mission)

we’re peeking in the concrete courtyard where kids play on black rubberized mats

we duck upstairs but the women are everywhere, emerging from a door, “can I help you?”

we ask for the minister

he’s eating lunch now

peering into central large room (it was once a big studio with tall ceilings, now elderly churchgoers are eating lunch—great fragrance of kim chi comes out, I’m hungry)

“Can we speak to the minister?”

the minister comes out, somehow he’s sizing us up, wiping his eyeglasses, “yes?”

“we’re here, ah, to see a mural—a painting”

“maybe for a million dollars”

ha ha ha, the minister moses cho turns out to be a great guy, leads us through a knot of people standing in the hall discussing

upstairs (“sorry for the big mess, probably smells terrible, doesn’t it?” “no, no!” “lunchtime!”) in a dim old stairway being used to store bulk cleaning supplies and stuff through a door

out onto the roof

(later he shows us a DVD about the mural rediscovery, the l.a. times article about it, etc.) to the edge of the roof over the courtyard where he points down to the east facing second story wall inset with three windows

that’s where it was, one of three murals painted by david alfaro siqueiros in 1932

we could see the entire wall, of course

it had been a speaker in a red shirt, speaking to workers sitting on scaffolding overhead, and a black man holding a child, and a white woman holding a child

but now the wall is green, painted over, with patches of blue duct tape where they scratched paint away to uncover parts of the mural to see if it was still there

all siqeiros murals—none are visible in los angeles

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