Sesshu Foster, The Battle of Algiers

Jun
29
2012
Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Museum Galleries

Sesshu Foster

5:00-8:30 p.m.  Giuseppe’s Bar Service

6:00-7:00 p.m.  Art-Making Activity: Aztec Character Paintings

7:00-8:00 p.m.  Reading from Atomik Aztex

8:15 p.m.            Screening of The Battle of Algiers

Art-Making Activity: Join Museum Educator Daniela Kelly for a hands-on art making workshop about Aztec Character Paintings that is fun and appropriate for all ages and skill levels.

This workshop will take place in The Studio.

Reading by Sesshu Foster: Sesshu Foster will read from his award-winning text Atomik Aztex.  In the alternate universe of Atomik Aztex, the Aztecs rule, having conquered the European invaders long ago. Aztek warriors with totemic powers are busy colonizing Europe, and human sacrifice is basic to economic growth. Zenzontli, Keeper of the House of Darkness, is plagued by nightmares of a parallel reality where American consumerism reigns supreme. Ghosts of banished Aztek warriors emerge to haunt contemporary Los Angeles, and Zenzontli’s visions of Hell become real as he’s trapped in a job in an East L.A. meatpacking plant.

This reading will take place in Gallery 18. 

The Battle of Algiers: 45 years after its release, this film remains an important political comment on modern warfare.  The Batlle of Algiers focuses on the early years of the Algerian War of Independence from France (1954-1962).  The work was banned in France for 5 years, but won international acclaim for its portrayal of the transgressions of both the freedom fighters and the occupying French army.  Even more surprising is that the film was commissioned by the Algerian government, but was not completely sympathetic to the rebels’ actions.  The film continues to be relevant today, and was used by the United States government showed the film to its constituents in preparation to deal with the insurgency of Iraq.

This film will be shown in the auditorium.  121 minutes, no rating, in French and Arabic with English subtitles.

 

Free after Museum admission.
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