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juan felipe

L.A. TIMES FESTIVAL OF BOOKS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks/tickets-and-schedule/schedule/

Seeley G. Mudd (SGM 123)Ticket required; Signing Area 4

11:30 a.m.

SATURDAY, APRIL 9, 2016
SEELEY G. MUDD (SGM 123)

Juan Felipe Herrera in conversation with Sesshu Foster
(Conversation 1092)

Interviewer: Sesshu Foster
Juan Felipe Herrera

Juan Felipe will also be reading at the festival’s Poetry Stage at 2:30 PM

Indoor Conversations require free tickets.

There are two ways to get Conversation tickets:

Online

Advance Conversation tickets will be available from the website starting April 3, 9 a.m. A $1 service fee applies to each ticket. See http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks/tickets-and-schedule/ticket-info/

At the festival

A limited number of tickets for each Conversation is distributed at the festival ticketing booth on the day of the Conversation — free of service charges. The booth will open at 9 a.m. each day.

Guests with Conversation tickets must arrive 10 minutes before the scheduled Conversation start time to ensure seating.

a poem by Juan Felipe:

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/03/06/magazine/juan-felipe-herrera-you-throw-a-stone.html?_r=1

latest book:

http://www.citylights.com/book/?GCOI=87286100437770&fa=author&person_id=4859

notesontheassemblage

Blood on the Wheel

BY JUAN FELIPE HERRERA

     Ezekiel saw the wheel,
     way up in the middle of the air.
TRADITIONAL GOSPEL SONG

Blood on the night soil man en route to the country prison
Blood on the sullen chair, the one that holds you with its pleasure
Blood inside the quartz, the beauty watch, the eye of the guard
Blood on the slope of names & the tattoos hidden
Blood on the Virgin, behind the veils,
Behind—in the moon angel’s gold oracle hair
                    What blood is this, is it the blood of the worker rat?
                    Is it the blood of the clone governor, the city maid?
                    Why does it course in s’s & z’s?
Blood on the couch, made for viewing automobiles & face cream
Blood on the pin, this one going through you without any pain
Blood on the screen, the green torso queen of slavering hearts
Blood on the grandmother’s wish, her tawdry stick of Texas
Blood on the daughter’s breast who sews roses
Blood on the father, does anyone remember him, bluish?
                    Blood from a kitchen fresco, in thick amber strokes
                    Blood from the baby’s right ear, from his ochre nose
                    What blood is this?
Blood on the fender, in the sender’s shoe, in his liquor sack
Blood on the street, call it Milagro Boulevard, Mercy Lanes #9
Blood on the alien, in the alligator jacket teen boy Juan
                    There is blood, there, he says
                    Blood here too, down here, she says
                    Only blood, the Blood Mother sings
Blood driving miniature American queens stamped into rage
Blood driving rappers in Mercedes blackened & whitened in news
Blood driving the snare-eyed professor searching for her panties
Blood driving the championship husband bent in Extreme Unction
                   Blood of the orphan weasel in heat, the Calvinist farmer in wheat
                   Blood of the lettuce rebellion on the rise, the cannery worker’s prize
Blood of the painted donkey forced into prostitute zebra,
Blood of the Tijuana tourist finally awake & forced into pimp sleep again
It is blood time, Sir Terminator says,
It is blood time, Sir Simpson winks,
It is blood time, Sir McVeigh weighs.
                   Her nuclear blood watch soaked, will it dry?
                   His whitish blood ring smoked, will it foam?
                   My groin blood leather roped, will it marry?
                   My wife’s peasant blood spoked, will it ride again?
Blood in the tin, in the coffee bean, in the maquila oración
Blood in the language, in the wise text of the market sausage
Blood in the border web, the penal colony shed, in the bilingual yard
                    Crow blood blues perched on nothingness again
                    fly over my field, yellow-green & opal
                    Dog blood crawl & swish through my sheets
Who will eat this speckled corn?
Who shall be born on this Wednesday war bed?
Blood in the acid theater, again, in the box office smash hit
Blood in the Corvette tank, in the crack talk crank below
Blood boat Navy blood glove Army ventricle Marines
in the cookie sex jar, camouflaged rape whalers
Roam & rumble, investigate my Mexican hoodlum blood
                    Tiny blood behind my Cuban ear, wine colored & hushed
                    Tiny blood in the death row tool, in the middle-aged corset
                    Tiny blood sampler, tiny blood, you hush up again, so tiny
Blood in the Groove Shopping Center,
In blue Appalachia river, in Detroit harness spleen
Blood in the Groove Virus machine,
In low ocean tide, in Iowa soy bean
Blood in the Groove Lynch mob orchestra,
South of Herzegovina, south, I said
Blood marching for the Immigration Patrol, prized & arrogant
Blood spawning in the dawn break of African Blood Tribes, grimacing
& multiple—multiple, I said
Blood on the Macho Hat, the one used for proper genuflections
Blood on the faithful knee, the one readied for erotic negation
Blood on the willing nerve terminal, the one open for suicide
Blood at the age of seventeen
Blood at the age of one, dumped in a Greyhound bus
Blood mute & autistic & cauterized & smuggled Mayan
& burned in border smelter tar
                    Could this be yours? Could this item belong to you?
                    Could this ticket be what you ordered, could it?
          Blood on the wheel, blood on the reel
          Bronze dead gold & diamond deep. Blood be fast.

Juan Felipe Herrera, “Blood on the Wheel” from Border-crosser with a Lamborghini Dream. Copyright © 1999 by Juan Felipe Herrera.  Reprinted by permission of University of Arizona Press.

Source: Border-crosser with a Lamborghini Dream (University of Arizona Press, 1999)

from http://www.poetryfoundation.org/learning/guide/244636#poem

 

 

 

Jen Hofer

on / with Antena / Antena Los Ángeles

presents:

¡El AntenaMóvil ya está instalado! Ven a nuestro evento bilingüe este sábado no solamente para compartir comida rica y conversación rica, sino también para ver/leer/comprar libros de muchas editoriales pequeñas y micros de Latinoamérica y Estados Unidos — incluyendo las maravillas locales Kaya Press, Phoneme Media, Ricochet Editions, Seite Books, y Writ Large Press. El Antenamóvil es un triciclo de carga adaptado, equipado con libros que están a la venta y para leer aquí. La selección se enfoca en obras bilingües y multilingües, textos en traducción y textos innovadores de escritorxs de razas marginadas.

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¡The AntenaMóvil is installed! Come to our bilingual event this Saturday not just to share delicious food and delicious conversation, but also to see/read/buy publications from many small and micro presses from Latin America and the U.S. — including local wonders Kaya Press, Phoneme Media, Ricochet Editions, Seite Books, and Writ Large Press. The AntenaMóvil is a retrofitted Mexican cargo trike stocked with books that are for sale and for reading on-site. The selection features bilingual and multilingual works, work in translation, and innovative texts by writers of color.

Justicia laboral alimentaria + Justicia del lenguaje: Un intercambio bilingüe
Food Labor Justice + Language Justice: A Bilingual Exchange
con / with Antena / Antena Los Ángeles, Cocina Abierta & ROC-LA
12 marzo / March 12
12pm – 3pm
Gratis / Free

Se proporcionará comida, pero si deseas, ¡trae una receta o un plato para compartir!
Food will be provided, but if you like, bring a recipe or a dish to shar e!
https://hammer.ucla.edu/antena12marzo/
Por favor RSVP / RSVP Please
(¡pero ven aunque no puedas RSVP! / ¡but come even if you can’t RSVP!)

Hammer Museum
10899 Wilshire Blvd
Los Angeles  CA  90024

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The Worker Body / El cuerpo trabajador, Cocina Abierta & ROC-LA, July 2015 / julio de 2015.
Photo/Foto: Heather M. O’Brien

Antena y Antena Los Ángeles, artistas en residencia con el programa de Public Engagement (Participación pública), junto con artistas, organizadorxs y trabajadorxs restauranterxs de la colectiva Cocina Abierta y El Centro de Oportunidades para Trabajadores de Restauranterxs de Los Ángeles (ROC-LA), invitan a lxs visitantes del Hammer a compartir comida, ideas y conversación en un espacio bilingüe. Les invitamos a escuchar las historias de trabajadorxs restauranterxs y posteriormente participar en un diálogo bilingüe durante una comida estilo familiar. Se proporcionará la comida, pero cualquier plato o receta que quieran traer será bienvenido.

¡Colabora compartiendo una receta para nuestro recetario! 

Las recetas que logre recolectarse serán utilizadas por Libros Antena Books para crear una pequeña publicación DIY (Do-It-Yourself o hazlo-tú-mismx), que será distribuida a todxs lxs participantes.

Public Engagement artists-in-residence Antena and Antena Los Ángeles, along with artists, organizers and restaurant workers from the Cocina Abierta collective and Restaurant Opportunities Center of Los Angeles (ROC-LA), invite Hammer visitors to share food, ideas, and conversation in a bilingual space. Visitors are invited to hear the stories of restaurant workers and afterward engage in bilingual dialogue over a family-style meal. Food will be provided, but feel free to bring a dish or recipe to share.

Participate by contributing a recipe for our recipe book! 

The collected recipes will be made into a small DIY publication by Libros Antena Books and distributed to all participants.

Jen also notes, NEWLY AVAILABLE:

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¡Ya salió la traducción de Estilo (Style) de la feroz escritora mexicana Dolores Dorantes! Puedes comprar el libro en Small Press Distribution o directo de Kenning Editions .

My translation of Estilo (Style) by the fierce Mexican writer Dolores Dorantes is out! You can by the book from Small Press Distribution or directly from Kenning Editions .

 

 

bax

an annual anthology of the best new experimental writing

BAX 2015 is the second volume of an annual literary anthology compiling the best experimental writing in poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. This year’s volume, guest edited by Douglas Kearney, features seventy-five works by some of the most exciting American poets and writers today, including established authors—like Dodie Bellamy, Anselm Berrigan, Thomas Sayers Ellis, Cathy Park Hong, Bhanu Kapil, Aaron Kunin, Joyelle McSweeney, and Fred Moten—as well as emerging voices. Best American Experimental Writing is also an important literary anthology for classroom settings, as individual selections are intended to provoke lively conversation and debate. The series coeditors are Seth Abramson and Jesse Damiani.

Guest editor DOUGLAS KEARNEY is a poet, performer, and librettist. He is the author of Patter and The Black Automaton. He lives in Los Angeles. SETH ABRAMSON is a doctoral candidate at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and author of five books, including Thievery, winner of the Akron Poetry Prize, and Northerners, winner of the Green Rose Prize. He will be teaching at the University of New Hampshire in the fall. JESSE DAMIANI was the 2013–2014 Halls Emerging Artist Fellow at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing and has received awards from the Academy of American Poets and the Fulbright Commission. He also lives in Los Angeles.

here’s a link to the issue’s digital content:

http://bax.site.wesleyan.edu/bax-2015/

blurbs:

“The permission is on every page here. The best annual experience where space is held for radical experimentation is in this book. Thanks to the editors for really keeping it real.”CA Conrad, author of Ecodeviance

“Whether oath, tweet, conspiracy simile, or tour of Hummeltopia, this anthology swings with verve and nerve from CM Burroughs’s ‘juncture of almost’ to Roberto Harrison’s ‘contaminate network of paradise.’ The experiment lives! It exists, Lance Olsen writes, ‘the same way, say, future dictionaries exist.’”Elizabeth Robinson, author of On Ghosts

$19.95 Paperback, 978-0-8195-7608-8
$40.00 Hardcover, 978-0-8195-7607-1

$15.99 Ebook, 978-0-8195-7609-5

Contents

• Guest Editor’s Introduction, Douglas Kearney
• Series Editors’ Introduction, Seth Abramson and Jesse Damiani
• Will Alexander, To electrify the abyss from The General Scatterings and Comment
• Steven Alvarez, tape 3
• Emily Anderson, from “Three Little Novels”
• Aaron Apps, The Formation of This Grotesque Fatty Figure
• Dodie Bellamy, Cunt Wordsworth from Cunt Norton
• Anselm Berrigan, rectangle 71
• Jeremy Blachman, Rejected Submissions to “The Complete Baby Name Wizard”
• Shane Book, Mack Daddy Manifesto
• CM Burroughs, Body as a Juncture of Almost
• Rachel Cantor, Everyone’s a Poet
• Xavier Cavazos, Sanford, Florida
• Ching-in Chen, bhanu feeds soham a concession
• Cody-Rose Clevidence, [X Y L O]
• Cecilia Corrigan, from Titanic
• Santino Dela, This is How I Will Sell More Poetry Than Any Poet in the History of the Poetry – Twitter Feed (The YOLO Pages)
• Darcie Dennigan, The Ambidextrous
• Steven Dickison, from Liberation Music Orchestra
• Kelly Dulaney, Incisor / Canine
• Andrew Durbin, from You Are My Ducati
• Thomas Sayers Ellis, Conspiracy Smile [A Poet’s Guide to the Assassination of JFK and the Assassination of Poetry]
• Bryce Emley, The Panthera tigris
• Adam Fitzgerald, “Time After Time”
• Sesshu Foster, Movie Version: “Hell to Eternity”
• C. S. Giscombe, 4 and 5 from “Early Evening”
• Renee Gladman, Number Two of the Eleven Calamities
• Maggie Glover and Isaac Pressnell, Email Exchange – Like a Flock of Tiny Birds
• Alexis Pauline Gumbs, “Black Studies” and all its children
• Elizabeth Hall, from “I Have Devoted My Life to the Clitoris: A History of Small Things”
• Brecken Hancock, The Art of Plumbing
• Duriel E. Harris, Simulacra: American Counting Rhyme
• Roberto Harrison, email personas
• Lilly Hoang and Carmen Giménez-Smith, from Hummeltopia
• Cathy Park Hong, Trouble in Mind
• Jill Jichetti, [Jill Writes . . .]
• Aisha Sasha John, I didn’t want to go so I didn’t go.
• Blair Johnson, The overlap of three translations of Kafka’s “Imperial Message” – I consider writing (a love poem)
• Janine Joseph, Between Chou and the Butterfly
• Bhanu Kapil, Monster Checklist
• Ruth Ellen Kocher, Insomnia Cycle 44
• Aaron Kunin, from “An Essay on Tickling”
• David Lau, In the Lower World’s Tiniest Grains
• Sophia Le Fraga, from I RL, YOU RL
• Sueyeun Juliette Lee, [G calls] from Juliette and the Boys
• Amy Lorraine Long, Product Warning
• Dawn Lundy Martin, Mo[dern] [Frame] or a Philosophical Treatise on What Remains between History and the Living Breathing Black Human Female
• Joyelle McSweeney, “Trial of MUSE” (from Dead Youth, or, The Leaks)
• Holly Melgard, Alienated Labor
• Tyler Mills, H-Bomb
• elena minor, rrs feed
• Nick Montfort, Through the Park
• Fred Moten, harriot + harriott + sound +
• Daniel Nadler, from The “Lacunae”
• Sunny Nagra, The Old Man and the Peach Tree
• Kelly Nelson, Inkling
• Mendi + Keith Obadike, The Wash House
• Lance Olsen, dreamlives of debris: an excerpt
• Kiki Petrosino, Doubloon Oath
• Jessy Randall, Museum Maps – Dominoes
• Jacob Reber, Deep Sea Divers and Whaleboats – Camera and Knife
• J D Scott, Cantica
• Evie Shockley, fukushima blues
• Balthazar Simões, [Dear Emiel]
• giovanni singleton, illustrated equation no. 1
• Brian Kim Stefans, from “Mediation in Steam”
• Nat Sufrin, Now, Now Rahm Emmanuel
• Vincent Toro, MicroGod Schism Song – Binary Fusion Crab Canon
• Rodrigo Toscano, from Explosion Rocks Springfield
• Tom Trudgeon, Part 2/21/6 from Study for 14 Pieces for Charles Curtis
• Sarah Vap, [13 untitled poems]
• Divya Victor, Color: A Sequence of Unbearable Happenings
• Kim Vodicka, U n i s e x O n e – S e a t e r
• Catherine Wagner, Notice
• Tyrone Williams, Coterie Chair
• Ronaldo V. Wilson, Lucy, Finally
• Steven Zultanski, from Bribery
• Aaron Apps, “You are only a part of yourself, collected in tangles”
• Matthew Burnside, In Search of: Sandbox Novel
• Alejandro Miguel Justino Crawford, Egress
• Lawrence Giffin, from Non Facit Saltus
• Tracy Gregory, For Mercy
• Tina Hyland, Google the Future
• Kaie Kellough, creole continuum – d-o-y-o-u-r-e-a-d-m-e
• Joseph Mosconi, from Demon Miso/Fashion in Child
• Dustin Luke Nelson, [Everything That Is Serious Can Have a Filter]
• Jeffrey Pethybridge, Found Poem Including History
• Acknowledgments
• Contributors

for sale at http://www.upne.com/0819576071.html

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Blacktop Ecologies: Los Angeles Poetry and Poetics was a one-day symposium of writers active in Los Angeles November 21, 2014. (“Though largely drawn from the interaction of poetry and teaching, the poets range from highly experimental, even “conceptual,” writers of lyric, narrative and political poetry, as well as translation and performance writing. There is no “subject” for the symposium — it is not concerned with Los Angeles or even its poetical history — but a snapshot of poets in Los Angeles today, how they think and make their work. Each poet will make a short presentation of their recent thinking and read selections of their work; each “lane” will be followed by a question and answer (for passenger loading only) period.”)

Brian did the work. Thanks Brian Kim Stefans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

totally free and open to the public

totally free and open to the public

Date: Friday, November 21st
Time: 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m (reception to follow)
Place: UCLA Humanities Building, Room 193

Blacktop Ecologies: Los Angeles Poetry and Poetics is a one-day symposium of writers active in Los Angeles today. Though largely drawn from the interaction of poetry and teaching, the poets range from highly experimental, even “conceptual,” writers of lyric, narrative and political poetry, as well as translation and performance writing. There is no “subject” for the symposium — it is not concerned with Los Angeles or even its poetical history — but a snapshot of poets in Los Angeles today, how they think and make their work. Each poet will make a short presentation of their recent thinking and read selections of their work; each “lane” will be followed by a question and answer (for passenger loading only) period.

zeppelin raids increase

Breakfast will be available starting at 9.
Lunch will be available starting at 12.

Blacktop Ecologies: Los Angeles Poetry and Poetics

9:45-10: Introduction

10-11:45: Lane 1

Aaron Kunin teaches at Pomona College (Milton, English literature 1500-1800, Poetics). His works include the novel The Mandarin (2008), and three books of poetry, Folding Ruling Star (2005), The Sore Throat & Other Poems (2010) and the forthcoming Cold Genius (2014). Grace Period: Notebooks, 1998-2007, a series of aphorisms, was published in 2013. He is a widely published reviewer of poetry and art.

Maggie Nelson teaches at CalArts (Poetics, Non-fiction) and is the author of five books of nonfiction and four books of poetry. Her most recent book is The Argonauts, a work of “autotheory” about gender, sexuality, sodomitical maternity, queer family, and the limitations and possibilities of language (May 2015). Her nonfiction books include The Art of Cruelty: A Reckoning (2012), Bluets (2009), and Women, the New York School, and Other True Abstractions (2007). Her poetry books include Something Bright, Then Holes (2007); Jane: A Murder (2005), The Latest Winter (2003), and Shiner (2001).

Andrew Maxwell is co-founder and -editor of the poetry journal The Germ (1997-2005) and presently founder and co-curator of the publishing collective and reading series at the Poetic Research Bureau. Long an advocate of local, small run publishing, he is the author of two collections of poetry, the aphoristic Peeping Mot (2013) and the forthcoming Candor is the brightest shield (Dec 2014).

Harryette Mullen teaches at UCLA (African American Literature, Creative Writing) and is the author of Urban Tumbleweed (2013), Muse & Drudge (1995), S*PeRM**K*T (1992), Trimmings (1991), and Tree Tall Woman (1981). Trimmings, S*PeRM**K*T, and Muse & Drudge were collected into Recyclopedia (2006) which received a PEN Beyond Margins Award. In 2002, she published both Blues Baby: Early Poems and the widely acclaimed Sleeping with the Dictionary. Her selected essays and interviews, The Cracks Between What We Are and What We Are Supposed to Be, was published in 2012.

12-12:30: Lunch

12:45-2:30: Lane 2

Christine Wertheim teaches at CalArts (Image+Text, Feminisms, Aesthetic Theories) and is a poet, performer, artist, critic and curator. Her books are mUtter-bAbel (2013) and +|’me’S-pace (2007), and she has edited the literary anthologies Feminaissance (2010), The n/Oulipean Analects (2007), and Séance (2006), the last two with Matias Viegener. Crochet Coral Reef, with Margaret Wertheim, is forthcoming in 2015. She has a PhD in literature and semiotics from Middlesex University. With her sister Margaret, she co-directs the Institute For Figuring, a non-profit dedicated to the intersections of math, science, art and pedagogy whose solo shows include NYU Abu Dhabi, the Smithsonian, Science Museum Dublin and Hayward Gallery London.

Daniel Tiffany teaches at USC (Modern Poetry and Poetics) and has published several works of important, idiosyncratic literary criticism: My Silver Planet: A Secret History of Poetry and Kitsch (2014), Infidel Poetics: Riddles, Nightlife, Substance (2009), Toy Medium: Materialism and Modern Lyric (2000) and Radio Corpse: Imagism and the Cryptaesthetic of Ezra Pound (1998). HIs most recent book of poetry is Neptune Park (2013), preceded by Privado (2013), The Dandelion Clock (2010) and Puppet Wardrobe (2006). He has also published translations of texts by Sophocles and the Italian poet Cesare Pavese, as well as Georges Bataille’s pornographic tale, Madame Edwarda.

David Lloyd teaches at UCR (English) and is the author of numerous books of criticism including Nationalism and Minor Literature: James Clarence Mangan and the Emergence of Irish Cultural Nationalism (1987), Anomalous States: Irish Writing and the Postcolonial Moment (1993), Culture and the State (co-authored with Paul Thomas, 1997), Ireland After History (2000) and Irish Times: Temporalities of Modernity (2008).  His most recent book is Irish Culture and Colonial Modernity, 1800-2000: Transformations of Oral Space (2011). Arc & Sill: Poems 1979-2009 appeared in 2012 from Shearsman Books, a collection of his many chapbook publications. A new sequence, Kodalith, appeared with the online press Smithereens in 2014.  He has long been the organizer of the Effie Street Reading series.

Diane Ward, early associated with the Language poets, is the author of numerous books and chapbooks including: Theory of Emotion (1979), Never without One (1984), Relation (1989), Human Ceiling (1995), Imaginary Movie (1992), Exhibition (1995), Portrait As If Through My Own Voice (2001), Flim-Yoked Scrim (2006) and No List (No List) (2008). Her work is anthologized in Out of Everywhere: linguistically innovative poetry by women in North America & the UK (1996) and Moving Borders: Three Decades of Innovative Writing by Women (1998). She is presently pursuing a degree in geography at UCLA.

Break

2:45-4:30: Lane 3

Sesshu Foster has taught composition and literature in East LA since 1985. He is the author of the book-length poetry sequences City Terrace Field Manual (1996) and World Ball Notebook (2008) as well as American Loneliness: Selected Poems (2006). He co-edited, with Michelle T. Clinton and Naomi Quinonez, the anthology Invocation L.A.: Urban Multicultural Poetry (1989) and is the author of the novel Atomik Aztex published by City Lights Publishing in 2005.

Jen Hofer is adjunct faculty in the MFA Writing Program at CalArts and teaches part-time in the Graduate Writing Program at Otis, and is a poet, translator, bookmaker, social justice interpreter, public letter-writer, knitter, urban cyclist, and co-founder (with John Pluecker) of the language justice and literary activism collaborative Antena, which recently had an installation at the Blaffer Art Museum at University of Houston. Her latest translations include the chapbook En las maravillas/In Wonder (2012); Ivory Black, a translation of Negro marfil by Myriam Moscona (2011); sexoPUROsexoVELOZ and Septiembre, a translation from Dolores Dorantes by Dolores Dorantes (2008); and lip wolf, a translation of Laura Solórzano’s lobo de labio (2007). Her most recent poetry books include the chapbooks “The Missing Link” (2014), “all at once and one at a time” (2013), and “Front Page News” (2013), and a book-length sequence of anti-war poem-manifestos, one (2009).

Will Alexander is an incredibly prolific poet often associated with Surrealism and the Negritude but a native of Los Angeles. His books of poetry include: Vertical Rainbow Climber (1987), Arcane Lavender Morals (1994), The Stratospheric Canticles (1995), Asia & Haiti (1995), Above the Human Nerve Domain (1998), The Sri Lankan Loxodrome (2009), Compression and Purity (2011) and The Brimstone Boat (2012). In addition, he’s published the essay collections Towards the Primeval Lightning Field (1998) and Mirach Speaks to his Grammatical Transparents (2011) as well as works of fiction and theater.

Paul Vangelisti is the Chair of Creative Writing at Otis College and has long been a staple — as writer, editor, curator of radio plays and publisher — of the Los Angeles Poetry community. He was co-editor of the literary magazine Invisible City from 1971-82, editor of Ribot, the annual publication of the College of Neglected Science from 1992-2002, and presently editor of or, a journal of poetry and translation. He is the author of twenty books of poetry, including Alphabets: 1986-1996 (1999), Days Shadows Pass (2007), Two (2010) and his selected poems Embarrassment of Survival (2001). His editing activities include Specimen ’73, Abandoned Lattitudes (including work by John Thomas and Robert Crosson, 1983) and Los Angeles Poetry, Place as Purpose: Poetry from the Western States (with Martha Ronk, 2002). He is currently editing, with Luigi Ballerini, a five-volume anthology of contemporary American poetry from 1960 to the present, Nuova Poesia Americana, for Mondadori publishing, Milan. He is also editor of Transbluesency: The Selected Poetry of Amiri Baraka/LeRoi Jones (1961-1995) and the forthcoming selection of Baraka’s poetry, S O S: Poems, 1961-2013.

for more information: https://blacktopecologies.wordpress.com/

get killed by bullets

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The purpose of fiction is to propose truths through conjecture.
Fiction does this in two ways:
• It reveals the hidden, often secret interior lives of people—their emotions, their thinking, their spirit.
• It questions and counteracts the on-going narratives (myths, ideologies, habits) that people believe and live, especially as they are unaware of them.

 

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magtitle

 

http://www.parrafomagazine.com/issues/06/index.html

“What You See, What You Take With You
after Marisela Norte’s photographs of Los Angeles—by Vickie Vértiz:

http://www.parrafomagazine.com/issues/06/vertiz/whatyousee.html

“Los Angeles Postcard”:

http://www.parrafomagazine.com/issues/06/foster/lapostcard.html

art by Daniel Gonzalez:

http://www.parrafomagazine.com/issues/06/artbook/gonzalez.html

 

eladt sign

 

 

 

We are pleased to invite you to the launch event of the sixth issue of Párrafo Magazine, dedicated to the city of Los Angeles. The event will take place at 5:00 pm on April 18, 2014, at UCLA (Royce Hall 306). Join us to celebrate our new issue and have some drinks with our authors, artists, and Editorial Board! We will also have copies of our magazine for sale at a special reduced rate!

Están todos cordialmente invitados a la Presentación del número 6 de Párrafo, dedicado a la ciudad de Los Angeles. ¡La cita es este viernes 18 de abril a las 5 pm en UCLA (Royce Hall 306)!

Párrafo No. 6 includes texts by Deborah Aguilar Escalante, Sesshu Foster, Alberto Fuguet, Pere Gimferrer, Vinicius Jatobá, Román Luján, Nylsa Martínez, José Luiz Passos, Anthony Seidman, Vickie Vértiz, and Maite Zubiaurre.

The Los Angeles Issue also features photos and artwork by Ryan Allen, Daniel González, Jean-Paul deGuzman, Mario de la Iglesia, Román Luján, Vinícius Praxedes, Johnny Taylor, Noah “Kast” Teran, and Elizabeth Warren.

At this time we will also release the online version of our issue with some “bonus tracks,” including an interview with film director Chris Weitz by Jesús Galleres, artwork by Sandy Rodríguez, and a photo by Oliver Shou.

 

kaya_early_photo

Dear Friends:

My tai chi teacher once told me that you can only really know a person over time. The same is true of any organization.

Next year, 2014, Kaya Press turns 20 years old. From a bright idea dreamt up by the poet Walter Lew, funded by the Korean novelist Kim Soo Kyung, and developed and nurtured over the subsequent years by Juliana Koo and myself, Kaya Press has grown into something approaching an institution. We have survived tidal changes in technology, publishing upheaval, cross-country moves, and national disasters. While the rest of the world spins around in ever more complex patterns and realignments, Kaya Press has quietly persisted.

That’s the terror and beauty of aging – over time, the true nature of anything eventually reveals itself. What these past 20 years of activity have proved more than anything is the power of Kaya’s animating mission.

At the heart of Kaya Press is a fairly straightforward idea—that
 the world moves forward because of acts of imagination. And we’ve always believed, regardless of what other publishers, and even some writers, might think, that great writing—and a vast range and variety of great writing—can consistently be found throughout the Asian and Pacific Island diasporas.

But if Kaya has been able to thrive over the years, it is only because of people like you. People who read Kaya books, support our authors at readings and events, donate time or resources—and have remained excited about what Kaya was going to do next, even when it seemed that we might not last another year.

As we continue to grow in our new home of Los Angeles, it seems fitting to take advantage of this Thanksgiving week to give thanks to all of you for your support of Kaya Press over the years.

Each person who donates during this year will have their name printed in ALL of our 20th anniversary books, regardless of how much they give. It’s a small gesture, but we want to make visible the work that all of you put into keeping Kaya Press alive. That animating force, like breath on a cold day, is both motivation and sustenance.

With your continued participation and support, we look forward to 20 more years of publishing!

Best wishes,
Sunyoung Lee
Publisher
Kaya Press

*Pictured above: Sunyoung Lee (left) with former publisher and current chair of the Board of Directors Juliana Koo (right) and author Sesshu Foster. Three long-time devotees of Kaya Press.

KAYA PRESS 3620 South Vermont Avenue, KAP 260 Los Angeles CA 90089 (213) 740-2285 (213) 740-0409 fax

KAYA PRESS
3620 South Vermont Avenue, KAP 260
Los Angeles CA 90089
(213) 740-2285
(213) 740-0409 fax

It’s the edited translation: http://gonzai.com/sesshu-foster-energie-atomik/

Energie Atomik

« Le juke-box Wulitzer de l’Univers est bourré de réalités 78 tours rangées côte à côte, préparez votre pièce de 10 centimes ». A lire Sesshu Foster, on devine le merveilleux bordel de son appartement. Son écriture est celle d’un ado cinquantenaire en furie, celle d’un désordonné à vie, d’un dérangé par nature. Son premier roman traduit en français (Foster habite Los Angeles), « Atomic Aztek », se présente comme un taudis gonzo parfaitement désarticulé et saturé de sous réalités à visiter comme autant de disques à savourer.

9782367870007L’anti-héros de son « Atomik Aztek », Zenzontli,  a des allures de petit frère nervo-rêveur qui cultive dans son antre sacré les historiettes que lui dicte son imagination contaminée. Comme ces mauvais conteurs de blagues, trop pressés d’en arriver à la chute pour bien ménager leurs effets, Zenzo l’hystérique mélange intrigues et voix, sautant nerveusement d’une action dramatique à l’autre. Atomik Aztek, dépourvu d’une trajectoire claire (« I am getting fucked in the head and I think I like it »), est plutôt constitué d’un agrégat de situations explosives. Foster exulte en nous livrant sa vision des bouchers qui s’entretuent, des cochons-mouches qui s’effondrent en masse dans la salle d’abattage de Farmer John, du soldat de l’Imperium Socialiste Aztek qui dévore une Introduction à l’histoire du Jazz pour préparer l’Insurrection qui vient ou des allemands qui se font massacrer à coups de mitrailleuses supersoniques. Le conteur d’Aztek de cette (non) histoire assassine joyeusement, le stylo en guise de carabine à plomb, tous les dieux et les maîtres qu’il croise. La cohérence du tout, c’est son moindre souci: « Je me fiche de paraître incohérent, mais était-ce au moins créatif? Etait ce enjoué? As-tu pris des notes? »

C’est, en somme, un « punk survitaminé qui se fout de la réalité » (l’expression est, sans surprise, de F. Wallace) que l’on rencontre. Un narrateur génialement détraqué qui fait gicler, tous azimuts, morceaux de récits et bribes de style. Tantôt le narrateur s’exprime comme un shérif bourgeois, tantôt comme un hippie paranoïde et tantôt plutôt comme un boucher espagnol. L’absurde le plus jouissif: « La sale guerre en Argentine sera l’équivalent de la saucisse ! Le Viol de Nanking paraitra aussi frais que le café moulu sur place ! La Solution Finale ressemblera à un demi pamplemousse ! », côtoie l’analyse philo-politique éthérée: « Voilà pourquoi les Amérikains ne touchent pas leur bille dans le Monde Réel (…) Ce genre de Nation de l’Ennui est un Destin Pire que la Mort !»; le grotesque enfantin: « il pète tendrement, un gros ballon de baudruche perd lentement son air », succède à un lyrisme tempéré: « le ciel changerait bientôt de couleur, s’emplissant de flammes et de chair vive, orange tel un oiseau de paradis, les plumets blancs des nuages et des éventails bleus s’ouvrant dans toutes les directions ».

Il y a chez Foster des effluves de Miller, de Bukowski et autres Kerouac.

Il serait donc idiot de réduire cet hallucinant premier roman à un joyeux bordel inconséquent. La nonchalance assumée de Foster ne nuit en rien à son cri: plutôt, elle l’intensifie. Si le jeune ridé délire en lançant ses piques et en riant ses meurtres, il attaque cependant toujours toujours dans la même direction, d’un même geste résolu. Cette direction, c’est celle de la révolte contre l’ennui et l’inertie. Sesshu Foster semble faire de la littérature le meilleur moyen d’être en guerre constante contre l’impératif raison et clamer, à l’instar d’un Breton dans ses grandes heures, « Plutôt la vie! ». Alors ici, c’est l’emportement à l’égard du consumérisme idiot, du travail résigné ou l’ennui satisfait; là, c’est la guerre contre le pouvoir imposé et l’Histoire objectivée. Ailleurs, ce sera la rébellion contre le logique narrative et en permanence, c’est le combat contre l’orthographe figée (tous les [k] du roman s’écrivent avec la lettre K, tous les « et » sont transformés en «&»). La guerre est finalement déclarée ouverte à tout ce-ki-se-réduit-à-n’être-ke-ce-ki-est, à tout ce qui se Fixe et qui Renonce. En écrivant, Sesshu Foster ouvre donc en grand les portes sa chambre kramée pour s’exhiber qui, sainement, éjacule sa prose guerrière.

July 2019
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